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“Recent Shit”


 


SOLO EXHIBITION BY DEVIN TROY STROTHER (USA)


 


April 4 – May 10, 2014


Opening reception: Friday, April 4, 5-7 PM


NB: (because of easter, gallery closed at Saturday April 19)


 


Palægade 5, 1261 Copenhagen K.
 Denmark


Phone: +45  2125 2325 &  + 45 2197 2525     


e-mailbendixen@contemporary-art.dk


Tues – Friday:  12-17,
 Sat: 12 – 15


 


 


 



Recent Shit:, the title of my exhibition, reflects and comments on the variety of styles and disciplines used in naming art works. The body of work doesn’t focus on any specific trends or modes of thinking, but on the relationship between a piece and its given name.


The history of titling art works and show exhibitions is truly intriguing. The polarizing exclusivity that results from the use of academic language in the contemporary art world has always been a topic of debate, and it’s that dynamic that my work reflects upon in many ways. One of the fundamentals of my practice is the focus on the play between objects. Predominately paintings and sculpture and words– Recent Shit: further explores the relationships we have with the things we see and the information about them that is presented to us.  I hope that the works and my practice as a whole are adding to the conversation about what titles are today and have been historically.


Whether it’s language used by art historians and critics or slang you might hear on the streets, the blending of these two forms of speech is what breathes life into my paintings. I’ve said this many times before, but I really do see parallels between my work and the basic setup of telling a joke. The painting acts as the setting or buildup. Images are presented to you and you get a sense of the situation; then, you read the title, which to me, is like a punchline. Like I said, the connection is basic– the work’s title is the payoff for the viewer, because in the end the work needs the viewer’s participation in some kind of way. The viewer is the link between the image and title; they put the two together. In this way I feel that my works and my practice as a whole add to the conversation about a title means to a piece through the history of art to current day.


 


A quick Google search on the topic reveals guidelines from various pedestrian sources. According to painterskeys.com:


“There are five main kinds of titles: Sentimental, Numerical, Factual, Abstract and Mysterious…Artists do well to set up their works and run them by a series of title possibilities. Ask yourself: ‘What am I truly saying here and what might be the sub-text of this?’ Consider the implications of your proposed titles and how they might add or subtract from your purposes.”


And  about.com says: “Choosing a good title for your art is important. It says something about what the drawing or painting means to you as an artist and gives the viewer some clues about approaching the piece. Because we take our art seriously, it’s easy to go a littler over the top. We’ve all seen it– the bored nude, sitting in a cold and poorly-lit studio, titled ‘Summer Reverie.’ Or an artificial arrangement of crockery titled ‘Afternoon Tea’. Possibly worse, is the complex and mysterious abstract piece with the unhelpful name…’untitled.’ With a little thought you can avoid a title clangers and find a good fit for your art and your audience.”


- Devin Troy Strother, April 2014


 


 


This is Devin Troy Strother’s second solo exhibition at bendixen contemporary art. Strothers  latest solo exhibitions, selected;  Marlboroughchelsea, New York,  Richard Heller Gallery, Santa Monica, CA,  Galeria Marlborough Madrid, Madrid, ES, and Cooper Cole (two person show with Gina Beavers), Toronto, CA.


Furthermore Strother’s works has been exhibited in selected group shows at museums and galleries in Canada, Europe and USA.


Devin Troy Strother lives and works in Los Angeles, CA and Brooklyn, NY.


 


 


www.bendixenart.dk


 


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